[fosc] [Dimond] FW: tree grates on the Lincoln Court trees

Sam Cohen Sam at Energy-Solution.com
Mon Feb 27 20:49:20 PST 2006


Hi Jean,
 
I'm glad to hear you're interested in the native fish in Sausal Creek.
To me, it's a wonder to live in Oakland and still have native salmonids
alive in our creeks. 
 
The resident rainbow trout in Sausal Creek are descendents of anadromous
steelhead that spawned in Sausal Creek. They spend their first year in
the creek and then swim out to the Bay and ocean to grow. Steelhead come
back during the winter rains to spawn. Unlike Pacific Salmon, steelhead
usually survive spawning and can return repeatedly to spawn. Because of
migrational barriers, steelhead (and salmon) cannot swim up Sausal
Creek. Therefore, we end up with only the resident trout that obviously
don't grow to the size of their ocean going brethren. Within the creek,
rainbow trout are isolated in very small populations because of
culverts, weirs, and drops fish can't jump over. 
 
Allowing fish migration upstream from the Bay is difficult because of a
large number of barriers that would have to be modified, including drops
(small waterfalls) and smooth culverts. While I would love to see the
creek channel barriers removed so fish could migrate up from the Bay,
what could be done much more easily is to facilitate fish passage on
sections of the creek above MacArthur. That would allow the populations
of trout access to more deep pools that are needed to survive summer low
water condition, ability to swim further upstream to find spawning
habitat, and access to more spawning partners. The number of trout is
low and it is easy to wipe them out if they can't move within the stream
to find the conditions they need. 
 
Friends of Sausal Creek has been working on trout passage, summer
habitat, and creating spawning areas (pools and low enough turbidity so
eggs don't suffocate). The creek channel restoration project several
years ago was a big improvement in terms of creating pools and allowing
for fish passage along a substantial length of creek. 
 
The next project to address the culvert in the middle of Dimond park
should address fish access and habitat. If we could connect up the
habitat that is separated by that culvert in the middle of the park, it
would be a huge improvement. It would also be good to create another
large pool for summer habitat. Additionally, some fairly minor work just
below the Leimert Bridge would then provide almost half a mile of
accessible creek.
 
The other thing to do is to monitor the populations of trout higher up
in the watershed near Highway 13. Many of these trout washed downstream
when the habitat they were using washed away in a huge storm more than
five years ago. After that event, many of us started noticing trout in
the lower sections of the creek. Since one nasty spill could kill all
the fish downstream, it would be good to maintain a population of trout
higher in the creek (with habitat improvement and transport from lower
in the creek if necessary). That way, the upstream fish could repopulate
the creek after a fish die off in the lower, more urban stretches of the
creek. 
 
What is the next step for continuing this discussion?
 
Thanks,

Sam Cohen

(510) 663-9928

 

	-----Original Message-----
	From: Quan, Jean [mailto:JQuan at oaklandnet.com] 
	Sent: Monday, February 27, 2006 5:16 PM
	To: Sam Cohen
	Subject: RE: [Dimond] FW: tree grates on the Lincoln Court trees
	
	
	While the designer calls them salmon, they look like generic
fish to me.  Thanks for more background, I have been running info on the
trout...I have been studying what it would take to let the salmon come
back up stream.

________________________________

	From: dimond-bounces at mailman.lmi.net
[mailto:dimond-bounces at mailman.lmi.net] On Behalf Of Sam Cohen
	Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 6:59 PM
	To: Rolf Pedersen; Dimond Improvement Association
	Cc: JArgueta at oaklandnet.com
	Subject: RE: [Dimond] FW: tree grates on the Lincoln Court trees
	
	
	The resident rainbow trout in Sausal Creek are descendents of
anadromous steelhead that spawned in Sausal Creek. They spend their
first year in the creek and then swim out to the Bay and ocean to grow.
Steelhead come back during the winter rains to spawn. Unlike Pacific
Salmon, steelhead usually survive spawning and can return repeatedly to
spawn. Because of migrational barriers, steelhead cannot swim up Sausal
Creek. Therefore, we end up with only the resident fish that obviously
don't grow to the size of their ocean going brethren. 
	 
	Within the creek, rainbow trout populations are isolated as
culverts and tall drops are often impassable barriers. Friends of Sausal
Creek has been working on trout passage, summer habitat, and creating
spawning areas (pools and low enough turbidity so eggs don't suffocate).
Generally, the trout will swim upstream in the spring looking for good
spawning habitat. We have observed rainbow trout spawning in the El
Centro pool and then two months later seen the fry so we know that the
spawning was successful. Rainbow trout typically spawn in the tail end
of pools in medium sized gravel.
	 
	I'm not aware of any documented instances of salmon in Sausal
Creek. Has anyone else heard anything definitive?

	Sam Cohen

	(510) 663-9928

	 

		-----Original Message-----
		From: dimond-bounces at mailman.lmi.net
[mailto:dimond-bounces at mailman.lmi.net] On Behalf Of Rolf Pedersen
		Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 6:13 PM
		To: Dimond Improvement Association
		Cc: JArgueta at oaklandnet.com
		Subject: Re: [Dimond] FW: tree grates on the Lincoln
Court trees
		
		
		I think salmon in Sausal Creek is not out of the
question: 
		
		"As memorialized in a plaque near the gate to Redwood
Regional Park in the Oakland hills, W.P. Gibbons of the California
Academy of Sciences named it a new species of the salmonid family after
studying three speckle-sided specimens from the San Leandro Creek
drainage. The spot was near where Alexander recently found his trout
nest.
		[..]
		Sightings of salmon in some streams that open to the bay
also are on the rise. This winter, a resident saw an unidentified salmon
in San Lorenzo Creek in Hayward, a chinook was spotted swimming in
Wildcat Creek below I-80 and a small run of chinook took place in Marsh
Creek in Oakley and Brentwood under the wide eyes of a citizen salmon
monitoring program."
	
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2005/04/22/EBGM2BSL7U53.
DTL&type=printable
		
		"In an ambitious plan that reverses years of habitat
degradation, steelhead and chinook salmon will again be able to ascend
the upper reaches of Alameda Creek above Niles Canyon, thanks to the
efforts of a dedicated group of anglers and environmentalists. 

		The plan, slated for completion by 2004-2005, focuses on
completing fish passage projects involving either dam removal or
construction of fish ladders past barriers in the lower creek so that
steelhead and king salmon can again migrate upstream. The main project
includes a $6.7 million proposal funded by the US Army Corps of
Engineers to build a fish ladder on the BART Weir in Niles and to remove
dams in Niles Canyon."
		http://www.fishsniffer.com/dbachere/030802alameda.html
		

		"The Sausal Creek watershed covers over 2,600 acres in
the East Bay. >From its headwaters in the Oakland Hills, the creek flows
through Dimond Canyon in Oakland before entering a culvert under the
Fruitvale Bridge and then into San Francisco Bay. Before flowing into
the culvert, lower Sausal Creek nurtures a verdant oasis. According to
citizens group Friends of Sausal Creek, the watershed is home to 80,000
residents, as well as over 250 plant and nearly 80 bird species.
		
		The creek-once known for its salmon run-used to flow
through forested hillsides. That began to change in the late 1800s, with
logging and urbanization."
		http://www.terrainmagazine.org/article.php?id=13397
		

		Rolf
		


		Ron Rifkin wrote: 

			Is it just me or can someone please connect
salmon with the Dimond or Lincoln or Sausal? 
			It seems appropriate for, as the website said,
the Pacific Northwest, NOT this part of Oakland, CA. In fact, IMHO all
of the designs on the site are more appropriate and even attractive,
excepting the Train motif and the Salmon. 
			
			Ron Rifkin 
			Whittle Ave. 
			
			On Feb 24, 2006, at 1:53 PM, Edward Goehring
wrote: 
			
			


				-----Original Message----- 
				From: Argueta, Jennifer
[mailto:JArgueta at oaklandnet.com] 
				Sent: Friday, February 24, 2006 12:58 PM

				Subject: tree grates on the Lincoln
Court trees 
				
				
				Unless there is a big objection, we will
use these tree grates on the 
				Lincoln Court trees. Please let us know
before they are purchased. 
				
	
http://www.fairweathersf.com/tree_grates_pages/smn_tree_grates.html 
				
				
				
				Jennifer Argueta 
				Assistant to Councilmember Jean Quan 
				1 Frank Ogawa Plaza, 2nd floor 
				510 238-7273 
				jargueta at oaklandnet 
				
				
	
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				Dimond at mailman.lmi.net is supported by 
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________________________________


			_______________________________________________
			Dimond at mailman.lmi.net is supported by
			the members of the Dimond Improvement
Association.
			More information about DIA at
	
http://www.dimondnews.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=38
			Manage your account at
			http://mailman.lmi.net/mailman/listinfo/dimond
			  

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