[fosc] INVASIVE SPECIES

Mjrauz at aol.com Mjrauz at aol.com
Mon Oct 2 19:03:09 PDT 2006


We are pleased to announce the 25th September 2006 launch of a new
interface for the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD)
http://www.issg.org/database. The world's premier source of free,
authoritative information about introduced species that threaten native
biodiversity and livelihoods now has improved content and functions.

We want to use this opportunity to let many more people know about this
important resource. The global invasive species problem is driven by
human activities and fighting back is possible provided communities and
decision makers are aware of the threats and have access to information
on what they can do.

Please disseminate the attached press release as widely as possible
using all the networks you have at your disposal. This includes your
colleagues in the broader conservation community, as well as libraries,
schools, universities and news organisations.

We will report on the results of this 'promotional' drive by posting
visitor traffic figures in December on the GISD home page. The GISD
currently receives more than 900 unique visitors per day (58,000 hits
per day).

Protecting the world from harmful introduced species

People around the world can access information about harmful introduced 
species easier than ever thanks to the September 2006 launch of a new website for 
the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). The world's premier source of 
free, authoritative information about introduced species that threaten native 
biodiversity and livelihoods now has improved content and functions.
   
While only a small proportion of the living organisms that are moved around 
the world with human activity and global trade actually cause harm, those that 
do can be devastating. Such “biological invasions” are now considered one of 
the biggest factors in biodiversity loss and extinctions. However, fighting 
back is possible provided communities and decision makers are aware of the 
threats and have access to information on what they can do about it.   

"The Global Invasive Species Database alerts people to the causes and 
consequences of invasive species and provides practical information about effective 
prevention and management options. It helps protect natural resources and 
livelihoods," says Michael Browne from the Invasive Species Specialist Group of the 
Species Survival Commission of IUCN-The World Conservation Union.

The GISD, which has been on-line at www.issg.org/database since 2000 and 
mirrored by the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) of the US 
Geological Survey at www.invasivespecies.net/database, currently receives more 
than 900 unique visitors per day (50,000 hits per day). 

It is also available in CD-ROM format, allowing people to access up-to-date, 
comprehensive invasive species information where internet access is restricted 
or non-existent. In keeping with the philosophy that anyone should be able to 
access information that can help them protect their environment, access to 
the GISD is free. 

For more information, please contact Michael Browne at issg at auckland.ac.nz or 
phone +64 9 3737599 (x86814)

Examples of the harmful effects of some introduced species:

The brown tree snake has driven into extinction 9 out of 12 of Guam’s native 
birds, effectively silencing their forests. 
http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?si=54&fr=1&sts=sss

Crazy ants in the Australian Christmas Island National Park are killing 
millions of land crabs and changing the entire ecosystem. 
http://www.issg.org/database/species/distribution_detail.asp?si=110&di=16483&sts=
 
In South Africa's Lake St. Lucia Protected Area, the invasive introduced 
triffid weed changes the sex ratio of crocodiles.  
http://www.issg.org/database/species/impact_info.asp?si=47&fr=1&sts
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