[Fosc] Fosc Digest, Vol 94, Issue 6

Gene Anderson gene at ouroakland.net
Thu Oct 11 13:24:43 PDT 2012


Of if you don't do Facebook, you can see it on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sQd0qyn5Lk

In any event, it's /very/ cool.

gene

On Thu, Oct 11, 2012 at 1:14 PM, John Slaymaker <jcslaymaker at ebhep.org>wrote:

> Hi! The video is posted to the FOSC Facebook page at
> http://www.facebook.com/FriendsOfSausalCreek
> Cheers,
> -John
>
>  -------- Original Message --------
> Subject: Re: [Fosc] Fosc Digest, Vol 94, Issue 6
> From: MC <shreemary at yahoo.com>
> Date: Thu, October 11, 2012 12:56 pm
> To: fosc at lists.sausalcreek.org
>
> The video didn't come through.  Can you post a link to it?
> Mary
>
> --- On *Thu, 10/11/12, fosc-request at lists.sausalcreek.org <
> fosc-request at lists.sausalcreek.org>* wrote:
>
>
> From: fosc-request at lists.sausalcreek.org <
> fosc-request at lists.sausalcreek.org>
> Subject: Fosc Digest, Vol 94, Issue 6
> To: fosc at lists.sausalcreek.org
> Date: Thursday, October 11, 2012, 8:36 AM
>
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> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. video of osprey hunting at montclair pond this sunday
>       (John Slaymaker)
>    2. Rise in Sudden Oak Death, "Epidemic" in Places (Mark Rauzon)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 10 Oct 2012 18:02:05 -0700
> From: "John Slaymaker" <jcslaymaker at ebhep.org<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=jcslaymaker@ebhep.org>
> >
> To: Fosc at lists.sausalcreek.org<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=Fosc@lists.sausalcreek.org>
> Subject: [Fosc] video of osprey hunting at montclair pond this sunday
> Message-ID:
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> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 11 Oct 2012 11:36:14 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Mark Rauzon <mjrauz at aol.com<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=mjrauz@aol.com>
> >
> To: fosc-sausalcreek.org at lists.sausalcreek.org<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=fosc-sausalcreek.org@lists.sausalcreek.org>
> Subject: [Fosc] Rise in Sudden Oak Death, "Epidemic" in Places
> Message-ID:
>     <8CF75DD4839DB25-1F98-2219A at webmail-stg-d11.sysops.aol.com<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=8CF75DD4839DB25-1F98-2219A@webmail-stg-d11.sysops.aol.com>
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>
> Rise in Sudden Oak Death, "Epidemic" in Places
> UC Berkeley scientists report an alarming and dramatic increase in sudden
> oak death, saying it has reached epidemic proportions in parts of the East
> Bay and Peninsula. Urgent preventive action is urged since infections can't
> be cured.
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> By Bay City News Service
> Sudden Oak Death, a disease that can destroy oak and tanoak trees in
> California, has reached "epidemic" proportions in parts of the East Bay and
> the Peninsula. Prevention efforts against further infestation are "urgently
> needed," according to an environmental task force.
> Surveys of California Bay Laurel trees in selected Bay Area cities,
> conducted by the University of California at Berkeley and volunteers, show
> that the pathogen that triggers the disease has spread rapidly in the
> western East Bay area and the North Peninsula, where "a staggering 48
> percent" of bay laurel trees tested in the Burlingame Hills were infected,
> according to the California Oak Mortality Task Force.
> The on-site surveys, known as "SOD Blitzes," of more than 10,000 trees by
> 500 volunteers identified bay laurel trees with evidence of the pathogen
> Phytophthora ramorum, which does not harm the bay laurel but can take hold,
> infect and eventually kill decades-old oak and tanoak trees if left
> untreated.
> "The bay trees are the primary spreaders of the pathogen," said Katie
> Palmieri, spokeswoman for the task force and UC Berkeley. "They indicate
> how much pathogen is in the area."
> Communities that also have high volumes of infected bay laurel trees --
> where spores from the pathogen show up as black and yellow coloring on the
> trees' leaves -- likely will see their oak and tanoak trees catch the
> disease as well, Palmieri said.
> "The next step is for oaks and tanoaks to be infected" within about a
> half-mile of infected bay laurels, she said.
> Sudden Oak Disease has been killing oak and tanoak trees in the wetlands
> of California's 14 coastal counties, Palmieri said.
> A survey this year by the U.S. Forest Service located 376,000 dead oak and
> tanoak trees within 54,000 acres in California, up from 38,000 dead trees
> inside 8,000 acres in 2011, she said.
> Leaf samples were gathered from SOD Blitzes last spring in East Bay
> communities such as Pinole, East Richmond, Kensington, North Berkeley,
> Claremont and Piedmont.
> The samples had pathogen levels so high that infection of oaks and tanoaks
> in those areas is "extremely likely, making preventative disease management
> options urgently needed to protect oaks and tanoaks both in private and
> public spaces," said Matteo Garbelotto, adjunct professor at Berkeley who
> operates a lab that analyzes the samples.
> The elevated levels of bay laurel infection observed in the western East
> Bay indicate that the disease has "rapidly transitioned from arrival
> (reported in 2011) to an epidemic phase," Garbelotto said.
> The pathogen thrives in moisture and so the wetter the seasons the bigger
> the outbreaks each year, he said.
> "This increase in infection really was predicted two, and especially one,
> year ago when we had heavier rains and mild springs," Garbelotto said.
> "SOD Blitzes, combined with aerial surveys, validate our theory that SOD
> outbreaks are driven by wetter than average conditions and are initiated by
> bay laurel infection," he said.
> If the disease spreads to an oak and tanoak, two similar but separate
> species of tree, it creates a dark wound in the trunks of the trees that
> expands to kill healthy wood, making it harder for the oaks to distribute
> water and nutrients, Palmieri said.
> "It can take several months to several years for them to die," she said.
> "The tanoaks are the fastest to die."
> Volunteers, also known as "citizen scientists," who take part in the SOD
> Blitz surveys of bay laurels are trained how to recognize diseased trees
> and to inoculate oak and tanoak trees to prevent the disease from spreading.
> The inoculation involves using Agri-Fos, a commercial fungicide that is
> absorbed into the tree and uses the tree's natural defenses against disease
> to block the pathogen.
> People seeking to protect their oak trees within the half-mile radius of
> infected bay laurel should consider using Agri-Fos, applied either
> topically or by injection, into the trees this fall before it gets wet,
> Palmieri said.
> There is no cure once the oak tree is infected, so prevention is crucial,
> Palmieri said
> "All it can do is help boost the tree's immune system," she said. "As long
> as you treat a tree before it's been infected, that is the key."
>
>
>
> Mark J. Rauzon
> Laney College
> Geography Dept.
> 900 Fallon St.
> Oakland, CA 94607
> mjrauz at aol.com<http://us.mc830.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=mjrauz@aol.com>
>
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