<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Courier" FAMILY="FIXED" SIZE="2">Three Salamanderers<BR>
<BR>
It was working so well, the bucket brigade, several 5 gallon plastic buckets used to scoop up woody mulch and haul it down the trail as you walked your dog. Seemed innocent if a bit naïve, sooner or late most things get thrown into the creek.   Already several buckets went missing. I loaded one and walked down the trail until I reached a bald spot and scattered my load. A side trail caught my eye and I parked my bucket and I wandered down to the leafy green dell. The “winter of the long drink’ was over and the bake was on. The strong sunlight beamed into a new clearing where the creek had jumped out of its bed and scoured a new gravel bank. This sunny growing grounds was recently planted by Oakland high school students in an restoration effort, part class- part social event, to covered a streamside, deweeded of Cape and German ivy. As I checked on the plantings under the weeds, I heard I was not alone. <BR>
<BR>
The trio of boy's, black, brown and white, Oakland’s youth were on the salamander prowl. Since they were yelling and running, I could move upon them in their distraction to see what they were up to. Here were the culprits engaged in a little hunting with a white plastic bucket. Flipping over the logs we had carefully placed in the restoration area, the kids were scooping up the exposed salamanders and putting them in their bucket.   <BR>
<BR>
“Hey what' going here?” <BR>
<BR>
“We're catching salamanders, snakes and lizards,” said one of the kids with unbridled enthusiasm. <BR>
<BR>
“Let me see,” I said. In their 5 gallon bucket was one arboreal and one slender salamander, damp skin on dry plastic-not good. I tried to tell the kids about this, but could see I wasn’t making any headway.<BR>
<BR>
“Let’s put them back,” I tried to reason with the kids. And they pretended to, so I finally took their bucket and dumped the amphibians out of harm’s way. The kid in black cap cocked with attitude shot back:<BR>
<BR>
"You own these?" <BR>
<BR>
Touché. He got me, "Well, no not really, I just made them feel at home here.”<BR>
 <BR>
Yes, I meant to say, I was responsible for them, but I was a poor authority figure. I oughta kick them outta here, I argued to myself. But I wasn’t in charge of this public project, the salamanders weren't mine, I was outnumbered and couldn't take their bucket away. There were more buckets on the other side of the creek. <BR>
<BR>
I mumbled “hey what were you kids doing away from school anyway?” and left them to their pillage. After all I had just been spouting off the day before how this generation does not had direct access to nature like all the past ones. How kids these days have to pass through security to go to school, and here were three boys doing what we did as kids along our local riverbank. Here they had a natural experience like the ones I lamented lost, and maybe these amphibians would have to be sacrificed to the greater good. I realized salamanders are the poor man’s lizards. The slow catchable kind, and the boys were doing what boys do... what I did. How many salamanders died at my hands, how many sunfish, tadpoles, I was especially deadly to frogs. <BR>
<BR>
But now I was the restorer, placing the logs just so, creating attractive nuisances to lured them to their death. Voilå, it worked and salamanders materialized in our wettest of winters. And I was privileged to witness the plunder, and remember that entrancing red cave salamander I caught so many years ago. As I walked away, I glanced over my shoulder and the three amigos went right back to the log I stopped them at. And while I’m not the best with kids, I realized maybe this is their childhood natural experience they’ll remember, (when that mean man yelled at us!) and I shouldn't get in their way any more, and sorry salamanders, next time I’ll make a safer place for you too.<BR>
<BR>
Mark Rauzon<BR>
</FONT><FONT COLOR="#000000" FACE="Geneva" FAMILY="SANSSERIF" SIZE="2"></FONT></HTML>