<html>
<body>
<font size=2>Here's a forwarded email from Susan Schwartz, of Friends of
5 Creeks. Trout gotta eat, don't poison the creek. <br><br>
<br>
HELP KEEP URBAN CREEKS ALIVE – AVOID PYRETHROIDS<br><br>
I spent all day yesterday at the Regional Monitoring Program’s annual
meeting, hearing reports on the status on Bay Area pollution. Many
problems are tangled and intractable. For example, the mercury and PCBs
that make Bay fish unsafe to eat are not declining, and we face daunting
technical problems and costs in trying to bring them to safe
levels.<br><br>
One serious problem, though, is completely avoidable. More than a quarter
of Bay Area urban creek sediments now test as toxic to aquatic insects,
the basis of fish and waterbird life. In most of these instances, the
problem is synthetic pyrethroids, compounds that have recently replaced
other, banned pesticides like diazinon. These pyrethroids are less
immediately dangerous to humans and birds. But they are very toxic to
fish and aquatic insects, and they are accumulating rapidly in sediments
throughout the state, especially in urban areas. The California
Department of Pesticide Regulation has just announced that it will review
pyrethroids’ approval, but action on that review may not come for years.
<br><br>
In the meantime, avoid synthetic pyrethroids, products with active
ingredients endinng in “-thrin” (e.g. permethrin, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin,
cypermethrin) as well as esfenvalerate. Read the contents when you buy
lawn or garden products, pet sprays or shampoos, or home pesticides
including ant killers and remedies for lice, mosquitos, and dust mites.
If you think you have a pest problem, ask an expert (such as Master
Gardeners) before treating your lawn or garden. If you live in a
condominium or apartment building, or work in an office building, ask
what they are using to control ants and other pests outdoors. <br><br>
By and large, we don't need these products. Their widest use is to
control ants – which can be done more cheaply, with longer-lasting
effects, using soap, water, caulk, and baits. It just takes a little
thought.<br><br>
Here is an example from the Regional Monitoring Program: Suppose you
apply Scott’s Turf Builder with Summerguard (Scott’s trade name for
bifenthrin, the most toxic of the synthetic pyrethroids). You follow
label instructions and apply a little over a pound to a lawn 20x20 feet.
If just 1% of that application were blown, swept, or washed to the storm
drain and reaches creek sediments, it would be enough to make 1.5 tons of
wet creek bottom mud toxic to aquatic creatures. To put it another way,
that recommended application of just over a pound would have to be
thoroughly mixed with 90 tons of dirt to make the dirt non-toxic to
aquatic life.<br><br>
Please don’t assume that because a pesticide is registered, or because
you follow label instructions, you will not harm the environment. Our
laws and regulations don’t do that. Look for less-toxic alternatives; use
the least amount possible. Our creeks will thank you.   <br>
</font></body>
</html>