<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16674" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY>
<DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390431103-06042010><FONT face=Arial><FONT color=#0000ff><FONT 
size=2><SPAN class=685280505-06042010>Mark 
-</SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390431103-06042010><FONT face=Arial><FONT color=#0000ff><FONT 
size=2><SPAN 
class=685280505-06042010></SPAN></FONT></FONT></FONT></SPAN> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390431103-06042010><FONT face=Arial><FONT color=#0000ff><FONT 
size=2><SPAN class=685280505-06042010></SPAN>This is the beginning of a great 
year for the watershed. Last year I saw a rather substantive increase in the 
insect biodiversity wherever I visited in the state. I think the rains from the 
preceding winter helped. With the rains from this El Nino year I am expecting to 
see even more!</FONT></FONT></FONT></SPAN></DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390431103-06042010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff 
size=2></FONT></SPAN> </DIV>
<DIV><SPAN class=390431103-06042010><FONT face=Arial color=#0000ff size=2>Last 
Saturday I was leading a bug hunt in Joaquin Miller Park. <SPAN 
class=685280505-06042010>Amongst </SPAN>the insects we observed was a glowworm 
(Coleoptera, Phengodidae). I was astounded. I have never seen a glowworm from 
Alameda County - I thought our county was too dry. When I worked on Cal 
Berkeley's Insect Hotline we got tons of calls from lush Marin County about 
these creatures, but never a single one from Alameda County. Since the 
females do not fly these creatures must have been in the watershed all along. I 
have wondered if there is a formal or any published record for what is here. Our 
watershed hosts incredible biodiversit<SPAN class=685280505-06042010>y. 
T</SPAN>he ongoing restoration work is important to that biodiversity<SPAN 
class=685280505-06042010>. Keep up the good work 
FOSC!</SPAN></FONT></SPAN></DIV></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV class=OutlookMessageHeader dir=ltr align=left><FONT face=Tahoma 
  size=2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> 
  fosc-bounces@lists.sausalcreek.org 
  [mailto:fosc-bounces@lists.sausalcreek.org]<B>On Behalf Of 
  </B>mjrauz@aol.com<BR><B>Sent:</B> 2010-0405 05:45 PM<BR><B>To:</B> 
  FOSC@lists.sausalcreek.org<BR><B>Subject:</B> [Fosc] Much 
  lushness!<BR><BR></FONT></DIV><FONT face=arial color=black size=2><BR>Spring 
  migration is underway at the creek, I heard the first of the season Wilson 
  Warblers on the 30th of March, then the first Pacific-slope Flycatchers on 
  Saturday when FOSC president Carl Kohnert and I scoped out the canyon for 
  Earth Day. Later I ran into a flock of Audubon and Myrtle Warblers: once 
  lumped as Yellow-rumped Warblers, they have recently been split into solo 
  species (again!). They and a junco were eating oak moth larvae, with the 
  junco carrying food to a hidden nest. With them was a Townsend Warbler.  
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>On Monday I ran into an old timer who grew up playing in the creek in the 
  1950-60's. He says he used to catch frogs and snakes in the creek- and they 
  and the fish disappeared around 1965-66 time frame. We have the trout back, as 
  evidenced by Sheelah's sighting of heron, and this guy saw a gopher snake 
  cross the trail above the Leimert bridge.  
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Mark Rauzon</DIV></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></BODY></HTML>