<html>
<body>
Here's an email from 2005, notes on some meetings with
EBMUD.    (Some errata added at the bottom.)<br><br>
Skimming them, the most important things are:
<ul>
<li>If you spot a water leak, report it ASAP: Call EBMUD, 24 hours a day,
7 days a week:   <b>866 403-2683</b>    
(then press 1 for English, then 0 to report a water main break.)
<li>If EBMUD crews are working on a leak, and water is entering a storm
drain, their BMPs (best management practices) should be in place: mesh
bags with pockets that hold tablets to neutralize the chloramine, and
gravel bags to prevent silt from entering the drain. If the BMPs look
inadequate to you, try to get a photo. 
<li>Let FOSC know by emailing the listserv or coordinator@sausalcree.org
</ul><br><br>
<blockquote type=cite class=cite cite="">Date: Tue, 13 Dec 2005 16:01:19
-0800<br>
To: fosc-sausalcreek.org@lists.sausalcreek.org<br>
From: Karen Paulsell <kpaulsell@pacbell.net><br>
Subject: [fosc] EBMUD and creek advocates meeting on chloramine<br><br>
I attended a meeting about chloramine pollution in the EBMUD service area
at EBMUD headquarters last week. I've been expecting an email with the
meeting summary promised by EBMUD, but since it hasn't come out yet,
here's my own take on the meeting. Sorry it's so long, but I wanted to
write down all the detail while I could still read my own
handwriting!<br><br>
<b>Why FOSC should care</b>: while chloramine keeps our drinking water
from contamination by bacteria, it's toxic to fish, amphibians, and
aquatic invertebrates. A water-main break can send very large amounts of
chloramine-treated water into creeks, often via storm drain inlets that
feed into creeks. Sausal Creek has had 2 serious chloramine-pollution
events; the most recent in the dry season, when the amount of water in
the creek was very low. So, for our creek-dwelling watershed residents, a
"water main leak" is a toxic spill. <br><br>
The meeting was instigated largely by Ann Riley, a long time creek
restoration expert who is now with the state Water Board.  Present
at the meeting: 
<ul>
<li>A bunch of EBMUD managers (Water Quality Manager, Environmental
Cmpliance Manager, Recreation Manager, plus a special assistant to the
General Manager.) 
<li>Several creek-group reps, including Baxter Creek, Strawberry Creek
(some from UC Berkeley, where they have their own issues, too),
Codornices Creek, and me, plus Urban Creeks Council folks 
<li>Alameda and Contra Costa County Clean Water Program reps 
<li>Ali Schwarz, from Oakland Environmental Services 
<li>Two folks from Citizens Against Chloramine, who started opposing the
Hetch Hetchy water system conversion to chloramine; issues are health
impacts and lack of sufficient study 
<li>A few other folks, intros went by quick! 
</ul>A bit out of order, here are some of the impacts that creek
advocates described: 
<ul>
<li>Sausal Creek: two major events in less than two years; no documented,
monitored evidence of fish kills; some anecdotal evidence of a sharp drop
in aquatic invertebrates 
<li>Baxter Creek: the speaker had really enjoyed the chorus frogs during
his first months in his new house by the creek; after a series of treated
water diversions during water main repair, the frogs have completely
disappeared. 
<li>Strawberry Creek: the speaker found 30 dead Sacramento stickleback
after a major spill. Repeated visits by EBMUD inspectors did not find a
problem, in spite of water bubbling up through pavement, until the spill
became quite serious and large amounts of chloramine had entered the
creek 
<li>Also on Strawberry Creek: after routine repair work (not a spill) the
resident had to make repeated calls to EBMUD to get a large amount of
yellow-brown soil removed from the street just above a storm drain.
Eventually crews with brooms and shovels removed the material; some had
been dispersed by then by passing cars, etc. 
<li>The speaker from Codornices Creek, where they have a device to
measure flow, showed that an EBMUD spill was the third-largest high water
event on the creek during one winter (or was it one winter month?) 
</ul>As I expected, we got the PowerPoint treatment.<br>
<br>
<b>First up: Chloramine and Water Quality<br><br>
</b>The 2 widely accepted treatments to control microbes in drinking
water are chlorine and chloramine (chlorine + ammonia compound.) 
EBMUD switched from chlorine to chloramine in 1998. These disinfectants
plus any organic compounds can produce byproducts. Chlorine produces more
by products, especially of trihalomethanes (I think that's right.) Levels
of these byproducts are federally regulated. With chlorine, the EBMUD
system was very close to allowed limits, and standards are getting more
strict. <br><br>
Chlorine dissipates faster than chloramine. In a glass of water, the
chlorine would dissipate in a day; chloramine -- I didn't get the number
down, I just remember the EBMUD speaker shrugging! (One website I checked
suggests a week, at least, for fish tank water.) <br><br>
EBMUD instituted more strict best management practices  for
chloramine spills after testing: they were surprised to find that
chloraminated water running over 400 feet across gravel and dirt, the
chloramine content dropped only from 1 ppm to .76 ppm. Over pavement, the
drop was less, over long stretches.<br><br>
EBMUD has over 4000 miles of pipe, with long distances from areas where
water can be treated to the tap. Smaller water systems, or those designed
with shorter runs may still be able to use chlorine. EBMUD switched; they
felt is was a "necessary choice".  As federal standards
tighten, more water systems across the country are switching to using
chloramine. (There are a few other treatment methods, but are rare, and
are generally in very small water systems.)<br>
<br>
<b>Next PowerPoint: The Surface Water Protection Program<br><br>
</b>Factors in water main breaks include: 
<ul>
<li>Land movement: slides, slumps, and so on, very common in steeper
parts of the EBMUD service area, such as our upper watershed 
<li>Temperature changes (expansion and contraction of the soil causes
pipe movement) 
<li>Pressure surges 
<li>Equipment malfunction (a faulty regulator was part of the problem in
the last Sausal Creek spill) 
<li>Pipe type: polybutylene pipes are more prone to break, esp. in
summer. 
</ul>In addition to water main breaks, sources of chloramine that may
enter storm drains and creeks are: 
<ul>
<li>Fire hydrant testing 
<li>Fire hydrants sheared by traffic accidents 
<li>Planned EBMUD flushing of mains 
<li>Certain repairs to mains 
</ul>EBMUD responds by dispatching an inspector as soon as possible,
24x7. (Average response time, from when EBMUD dispatchers take the call:
38 minutes.) The inspectors assesses the spill, and assigns a priority
based on the size of the spill and the proximity to surface water (that
is, creeks and lakes).  The assigned priority directly affects how
quickly the spill is fixed: a P5 rating means "respond in 1 hour,
fix in two hours", while a P4 repair may take up to a
week.</blockquote><br>
<b>Best Management Practices<br><br>
<br>
</b><blockquote type=cite class=cite cite="">If needed, and safe to do,
they also install mitigation, in accordance with their  BMPs. (Best
Management Practices.) The goal is to have these in place within 30 to 60
minutes of the time EBMUD is notified. BMP measures are: 
<ul>
<li>Strips or mats that hold tablets of sodium sulfite that neutralizes
the chloramine; water flows through the mesh openings in the bags to
expose water to the tablets (these might not always be visible, they try
to hide the bags to folks won't mess with the them, especially with
tablets.) 1 tablet can neutralize 100 gallons per minute for 45 minutes. 
<li>Mesh bags of pea gravel, to catch sediment by forming dams or catch
basins; when properly installed, they take out 30% to 50% of the
sediment. 
</ul>When the PowerPoint slide of these BMPs in place on a storm drain
inlet came up, several of the creek advocates hooted. They said they'd
never, ever, seen the BMPs used in an adequate manner. The mesh bags were
too small to cover the tops of most storm drain inlets. The EBMUD trucks
never seemed to have enough gravel bags to do the job: sediment-carrying
water flowed over them and around them. Creek advocates also pointed out
that, especially when days elapse between the time the BMPs are put in
place and the time the repairs are done, traffic, parking, etc., can
displace or destroy the BMP devices. <br>
<br>
Then Ann Riley spoke up. She said that the Regional Water Board was quite
surprised by the size of the fisheries in local, urban creeks, and had
been contacted by NOAA fisheries division. (For example, brush clearing
along lower Cordonices Creek uncovered 130+ steelhead. Steelhead? In
Berkeley?) She mentioned that Marin Municipal Water District has a
Fishery Biologist on 24x7 standby to respond to spills near fish-bearing
streams.<br><br>
She held up a list of the 100 spills that had been sent to the Water
Board by EBMUD (maybe they were spills over a given magnitude; one of the
EBMUD people said there were 900 spills per year). She felt that given
the seriousness of the effects on fish-bearing streams, and the creek
advocates testimony about poor implementation of BMPs, more review of
EBMUD's practices were in order. That the water board wants to see an
enforcement plan. (The EBMUD folks were all glancing at each other with a
bit of dismay -- gee, wasn't that PowerPoint glitzy enough?)<br><br>
Riley said the felt that areas that need to be discussed are: 
<ul>
<li>The application of BMPs -- even if they're adequate, they don't seem
to be used properly by crews, or crews don't have all the needed supplies
on their trucks at all times 
<li>She wants to know the range of response times, not just the averages:
the 38-minute time can hide some major response time issues, particularly
with 900 incidents 
<li>Improving post-spill cleanup protocols 
<li>Reviewing the areas where spills are rated as high priority;
especially in proximity to fish-bearing streams. 
</ul>I've noted a few other suggestions made by folks, not sure who: 
<ul>
<li>Alternative emergency response possibilities (for example, fire
fighters trained to use the BMPs 
<li>Training "Emergency Response Teams" from creek groups and
neighborhoods to use BMPs, and what to do about spills 
<li>Downstream sampling during/after spills 
<li>A continual chlorine monitoring system for creeks to detect spills
early 
<li>3rd-party review of pipes and maintenance procedures, and a
cost-benefit analysis of improving maintenance (EBMUD said some of this
had been done) 
</ul>So, there will probably be a follow-up meeting with creek advocates,
and another with city and county representatives from the EBMUD service
area.<br><br>
<br>
<b>Who You Gonna Call?<br><br>
</b>If you see increased flow and lots of sediment in the creek, and it
hasn't just rained: Call EBMUD, 24 hours a day, 7 days a
week:   <b>866 403-2683</b>     (then press
1 for English, then 0 to report a water main break.) <br><br>
Do email the listserv, too. <br><br>
If you see the problem in Dimond Park or Dimond Canyon, a quick check up
at the Golf Course off Monterey can tell you whether it's coming from
Shepherd Canyon or from the Joaquin Miller Park area. The intersection of
the creeks is to the right of the driveway, just as it meets the parking
lot. The closer fork comes from JM Park, the other branch is Shepherd
Canyon, where the last 2 breaks occurred.<br><br>
If you know the location of the break, and have a digital camera, take
some pictures if you think that the BMPs are not sufficient to keep
chloraminated water and sediment from entering storm drains. I can pass
pictures on to Ann Riley.<br>
<br>
</blockquote><br>
=========================================================================<br>
<br>
<br>
Corrections:<br><br>
I shared my notes on the meeting with Ann Riley, from the regional water
board, and she noted a few items to change:<br><br>
About rainbow trout/steelhead: 
<dl>
<dd>On lower Codornices Creek, on the Albany/Berkeley border, over 130
fish were relocated to do a restoration project (I had said that
"130 fish were found.") Further, she adds: "They are also
in downtown Martinez, discovered during restoration activities  by
the Urban Creeks Council and in the City of Richmond and  City of
San Pablo." 
</dl>Ann also noted that on her list of concerns the water board wants to
pursue are: 
<ul>
<li>A review of their pipeline repair  plan and schedule 
<li>Explore other technologies to prevent  or mitigate impacts from
spills from pipes. 
<li>They are open to discussing the big picture on the advantages and
disadvantages of using chloramines. 
</ul>EBMUD has sent the water board records that indicate that there have
been about 100 spills per month for the past 40 months.  (Not 100 in
40 months as I had said.)</body>
</html>